How Comparative Law Enhances Constitutional Development And Peace Building

Peace is a vital element that every society strives to achieve and all communities across the world work to ensure their fabric is not distorted by conflicts. However, in some situations it becomes challenging to guarantee peace and build structures that are aligned towards enhancing the achievement of togetherness in communities. One of the ways communities can enhance the prevalence of unity and peace is by coming up with laws that offer everyone rights and protections together with enhancing the access to vital resources.

A constitution serves this purpose perfectly and helps to eliminate challenges in governance that could come as a result of misplaced legal configuration. Before putting laws in place, there is the research phase that allows the experts to understand the kind of legislation that could be installed to solve every problem that bars progress. This is a process that invites professionals from various parts the world who come with distinct ideas and suggestions that contribute towards developing new and useful laws.

Comparative law is the only way such a process can be possible and it is a unique method through which government agencies can learn about the different laws that are used in other regions across the world. With information about the laws that are applied in other countries, experts can pick all the vital details that can assist in the development of an entirely new constitution.

Countries like China have emphasized on the need to embrace comparative law in the process of developing new laws that are relevant with the needs of the modern world.

About Sujit Choudhry

Sujit Choudhry is a comparative law expert and the founder of the Center for Constitutional Development, which has been offering information to support constitution building by coming up with internationally recognized experts who sit to brainstorm the development of constitutional laws to help in governance and settle conflicts. The body has been partnering with universities and NGOs to enhance access to resources and the needed expertise to develop useful laws.

Before moving to Berkeley, Sujit Choudhry was working as a law professor in NYU School of Law. In 2010, he was listed among four Canadians to earn the Trudeau Fellowship award. He is a distinguished scholar and author who has contributed immensely in the development of comparative law as a field of study and research.